Compared with Surface Pro, iPad Pro May Fall Short in the Enterprise

11 Sep

Apple announced its large-size tablet computer iPad Pro on Sept. 9. The 12.9-inch tablet, with its Apple Pencil and the full‑size keyboard, seems more suitable in the workplace, compared with its predecessors that were with an emphasis on entertainment. However, it may be difficult for the iPad Pro to compete with Microsoft’s Surface Pro in the enterprise, as the latter has established a reputation after three generations.

Apple’s product designs are primarily anchored by founder Steve Jobs. At the launch of the first iPhone in 2007, Jobs frowned upon stylus and large-size devices. Eight years later, however, Apple under Tim Cook’s control rolled out a large-size tablet iPad Pro with a stylus. Apple has high expectations of the new product in the enterprise market and hopes it can drive up the iPad sales.

Many contended that Apple’s iPad Pro bears a resemblance to Microsoft’s Surface Pro. When the Surface series were first introduced, its potential was questioned as people expressed their lack of interest in something “not like the PC or the tablet.” After three generations of modifications, the touch screen-enabled tablet with a keyboard has become a stable for many office users. Surface is almost a synonym for such devices.

The Surface Pro and the iPad Pro are powered by different processors but both are with efficiency not inferior to desktop computers. It is hard to say which of the two products are more powerful, before the benchmark results are available. However, judging from software and OS systems, Surface Pro has an apparent advantage based on its Windows 10 and Office software.

The Office software was demonstrated on iPad Pro at the launch event, a sign that Apple is finding it difficult to compete with Microsoft when it comes to office suites. Meanwhile, the iOS is mainly designed for small-size devices and is entertainment-centric. The iPad Pro might have been more competitive if Apple had chosen to use the Mac OS system.